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Archive for month: November, 2013

A Time for Gratitude

“Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all others.”― Cicero

In the United States the Thanksgiving holiday is upon us. Not only is this a great season to enjoy time with family and friends, it is also a wonderful time to give thanks for the blessings that have come our way.gratitude

For  many of us, it is easy to focus on the “bad” stuff happening around us. Whether it is occurring in your own personal or professional life or in the world around you, it doesn’t take much to become consumed in the negative.  If you change your thoughts to thoughts of gratitude – notice how your views begin to shift.

The first step to happiness and success is acknowledging all that is great in and around you. This week – the week of Thanksgiving – is the perfect time to begin.

So from me to you – Thank You for being part of our community. May the good things of life be yours in Abundance.

Happy Thanksgiving,

Joy

The Devil is in the Details

The end-in-sight for a change initiative is attainment of the objectives. The end of the journey, to lead people to the attainment of the objectives, is to have established the opportunities, devil in the detailsthe environment, and the climate to allow people to acquire

the Four Cs:

1. Comfort

2. Competence

3. Confidence

4. Control

Seeking comfort means that people desire what is familiar. This means that even if the dog is bad, he’s MY dog: I know his name, he comes when he’s called, and I know just where to scratch his head. Providing comfort means allowing people to get used to the sight, sound, and implications of the anticipated changes. It includes communication and visible symbols of the changes.

Desiring competence implies avoidance of the natural fear that drives the questions of, “Can I learn this? Can I be successful after the changes? What will happen to me, and my job, if I cannot do it/learn it/adapt?” Mitigating these fears means avoiding the pothole of short-cutting education and training for the sake of expediency. It includes providing the opportunity to allow people to become competent.

Achieving and maintaining confidence has multiple implications. In times of change, people may question confidence in their own abilities, confidence in the goals, plans and leadership of the initiative, and even confidence in the leadership of their company. After all, “just who thought up this change initiative that is creating an upheaval?”

Building trust in times of change is a significant element of change leadership, and a requirement that cannot be overstated. Proactive, highly visible executive support, prolific and focused communication, and honesty are all requirements for creating, building, and re-building that trust and confidence.

Becoming empowered, having control, is an enormously strong desire, and one that may be perceived as difficult to provide to all people in an organization in times of change. Certainly, asking everyone in the company what they want is not good business. Micro-managing every aspect of the desired end-result (the objectives), or the journey through change, isn’t advisable either.

Providing the sense and reality of control to others means helping employees to:

  • understand what has to happen
  • recognize where their input is desired and valuable
  • identify what they can control themselves, without additional or supervisory permission
  • Understanding the end of the journey

Successfully leading people through the changes allows us to embark on the move to the State of Change.

Contact Team@BeyondBBD.com for a complimentary consultation on The Devil in the Details.

Until next time…

Accept the Unexpected …

Accept the Unexpected …

Recently, my partner, Gary asked me to host a dinner party at our house for 20 professionals from his company.

I generally really love hosting a wide eyed womangood party, but this was an extremely important party. Not only were the professionals an important part of his company [and they all flew in for the evening to meet the honored guest], the focus was around a new product launch, and the product creator was the honored guest. As you can imagine, I was paying extra close attention to all details.

As I was busy inviting guests into our home, I was anxious for the guest of honor to arrive. Gary had already told me that he was a tad bit eccentric. Tad bit?

The first guests who arrived were in business casual attire, well put-together, very matchy-matchy [which didn’t surprise me, as it’s a very conservative company]. Then, the man of the hour arrived…with loud, back slapping hugs and looking surfer-like with his long, curly hair, LOW riding jeans and flip flops. He definitely wasn’t matchy-matchy with the rest of the guests – in dress or in personality.

Remember how I said that I paid attention to all details for the night? I had googled the guest of honor and found out that he had been the manager of a popular rock band in a previous career. So, being on top of my game, I decided to play the music of that band. Because I was so extremely proud of myself, I asked him if he noticed the music. I wish I hadn’t done that. Let’s just say that didn’t quite go as planned. After he heard the music, he went into a [very unexpected!] loud, long, dramatic story of how the girl in the band was an ex-girlfriend who broke his heart. I was offered way more details of his heartbreak than I ever wanted to know. I quickly backed away and changed the music. So much for super-hostess details.

And that was just the beginning of the interesting events. The guest of honor was a free spirit for sure—definitely not the typical business professionals I’m accustomed to. Not only was his look non-Minnesotan and non-business casual, his vocabulary was – well let’s just say – VERY colorful, and it went right along with his colorful personality.

All in all, it was a very fun and interesting evening, definitely not our typical dinner party.

The evening and my reaction to it made me think about a few things …

1. Even when you think you have covered all the details, be flexible. You can’t predict the unpredictable so don’t let it derail you.

2. Is there ever a time when it is NOT okay to show the world who you truly are? Are there times when you need to be more or less of something?

I’d really love to hear your thoughts about being prepared for and accepting the unexpected. Go ahead and leave them in the comment section below. If you have a similar story to tell, please share that. I’m sure other readers would like to hear your story about when you learned to ‘accept the unexpected’.

Accept the unexpected …

Recently, my partner, Gary asked me to host a dinner party at our house for 20 professionals from his company.

I generally really love hosting a wide eyed womangood party, but this was an extremely important party. Not only were the professionals an important part of his company [and they all flew in for the evening to meet the honored guest], the focus was around a new product launch, and the product creator was the honored guest. As you can imagine, I was paying extra close attention to all details.

As I was busy inviting guests into our home, I was anxious for the guest of honor to arrive. Gary had already told me that he was a tad bit eccentric. Tad bit?

The first guests who arrived were in business casual attire, well put-together, very matchy-matchy [which didn’t surprise me, as it’s a very conservative company]. Then, the man of the hour arrived…with loud, back slapping hugs and looking surfer-like with his long, curly hair, LOW riding jeans and flip flops. He definitely wasn’t matchy-matchy with the rest of the guests – in dress or in personality.

Remember how I said that I paid attention to all details for the night? I had googled the guest of honor and found out that he had been the manager of a popular rock band in a previous career. So, being on top of my game, I decided to play the music of that band. Because I was so extremely proud of myself, I asked him if he noticed the music. I wish I hadn’t done that. Let’s just say that didn’t quite go as planned. After he heard the music, he went into a [very unexpected!] loud, long, dramatic story of how the girl in the band was an ex-girlfriend who broke his heart. I was offered way more details of his heartbreak than I ever wanted to know. I quickly backed away and changed the music. So much for super-hostess details.

And that was just the beginning of the interesting events. The guest of honor was a free spirit for sure—definitely not the typical business professionals I’m accustomed to. Not only was his look non-Minnesotan and non-business casual, his vocabulary was – well let’s just say – VERY colorful, and it went right along with his colorful personality.

All in all, it was a very fun and interesting evening, definitely not our typical dinner party.

The evening and my reaction to it made me think about a few things …

1. Even when you think you have covered all the details, be flexible. You can’t predict the unpredictable so don’t let it derail you.

2. Is there ever a time when it is NOT okay to show the world who you truly are? Are there times when you need to be more or less of something?

I’d really love to hear your thoughts about being prepared for and accepting the unexpected. Go ahead and leave them in the comment section below. If you have a similar story to tell, please share that. I’m sure other readers would like to hear your story about when you learned to ‘accept the unexpected’.